SLAVOJ ZIZEK: A CRITICAL INTRODUCTION


This is the fifth chapter of Ian Parker's Slavoj Zizek: A Critical Introduction published by Pluto Press in London in March 2004. The first four chapters deal in detail with the formation and decomposition of Yugoslavia (Chapter 1), how Zizek articulates a particular reading of Hegel (Chapter 2), how he reads Lacan as he likes (Chapter 3), and how sets himself against Marxism (Chapter 4). The book is very sympathetic but very critical of Zizek. Ian Parker is Professor in the Discourse Unit at Manchester Metropolitan University and author of books on psychoanalysis, discourse, politics and culture. He is a practising psychoanalyst, member of the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research and the London Society of the New Lacanian School. Advance warnings about the book include: 'When I read Parker's manuscript, I experienced an underlying solidarity: despite obvious differences, we share the same basic political concerns and visions. And this makes his critical remarks always pertinent!' (Slavoj Zizek, Ljubljana, Slovenia); 'A sharp, clear and radical analysis of Zizek's works which is sustained by an acute combination of a close reading of Zizek as a Lacanian and an examination of his cultural context.' (Christian Ingo Lenz Dunker, Lacanian Psychoanalyst and Professor of Psychoanalytic Theory, Sao Paulo, Brazil); 'Ian Parker's book is exemplary of an emerging mode of activist interpretation. In reading Zizek's writings, he goes beyond the local annotation of texts and situates the reader in the center of layered contemporary cultural and theoretical arguments.' (Teresa L. Ebert, author of Ludic Feminism and After, New York, USA); 'This is not simply "the best" critical introduction to Zizek — in a much more radical sense, this is the only critical introduction to Zizek. Parker's study is much more than an "important contribution" to the ongoing debate: it redefines its very terms. If this work does not become a standard work of reference, the only conclusion will be that Western academia is caught in an obscure desire to self-destruct.' (Yannis Stavrakakis, author of Lacan and the Political, Athens, Greece).

by Slavoj Zizek 

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